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Loan officers come across people who have never owned a home, and don’t even know how to go about it. The American Bankers Association is offering tips to help consumers prepare for one of the first steps in the home buying process: saving for a down payment. Before transitioning from renter to home owner, potential buyers must typically save between 5 and 20 percent of the home’s value for the down payment – and it may not be as difficult as renters think!

 

 

BUDGET

First, develop a budget and timeline. What kind of home does the renter have their eye on? What is the price estimate? Determine how much the borrower will need for a down payment, and then work backwards to create a budget and calculate how much should be, and can be, saved every month. That will help the borrower gauge when they will be ready to transition from renter to homeowner. Some renters establish a separate savings account for the down payment to lower the temptation to spend it. Make the monthly contributions automatic.

 

 

 

SHOP AROUND

Potential buyers should shop around to reduce major monthly expenses on current expenses such as car insurance, renter’s insurance, health insurance, cable, internet or cell phone plans. Not that only renters should do this, but there may be deals or promotions available that allow anyone to save hundreds of dollars by adjusting contracts. On the flip side, monitor spending. With online banking, keeping an eye on spending is easier than ever, and seeing where most of one’s income is going is very enlightening.

 

 

 

 

FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYERS 

Lastly, loan officers can help potential borrowers look into state and local home-buying programs. Many states, counties and local governments operate programs for first-time homebuyers. Some programs offer housing discounts, while others provide down payment loans or grants.

 

 

 

 

 

There are plenty of benefits to home ownership, and buying one is an event to be celebrated – but laying the groundwork is critical! And originators are in an ideal place to help borrowers on their way

 

 

 

Is a down payment the only thing keeping you from purchasing a home?

 

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Lenders Know That There are More Millennials than Baby Boomers

 

 

 

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Making The Right Choice

Oct 27
1:06
PM
2017
Category | Homebuying

You’ve done the right thing. Taken the advice of your realtor and gotten a pre-approval from a lender. Now on to the buying process! However, are you really approved? Has your file gone through the underwriting process? Did you provide documents to verify your income and assets? If not, then you might not really be “pre-approved.” This is considered more of a pre-qualification process when those two things don’t happen. If so, then you shopping for a home could potentially end in disaster and you not purchasing that home of your dreams!

 

So what do you do to avoid potential disaster?  Ask your lender the following questions:

  • What documents do you need from me to get me pre-approved by your underwriter?
  • When will my file go into underwriting?
  • How long will it take to get an answer back from underwriting?
  • How quickly will I be able to close after I get an accepted purchase agreement?
  • When can I lock my rate and for how long?
  • What could delay my approval or closing?


These questions are crucial to a successful purchase and closing of a home. If any of those questions cannot be answered easily by your lender of choice, then you may want to consider shopping around. Of course, other things are important also: loan type, rate and costs. However, none of that will matter if you are not able to close the loan.

 

In today’s market, most lenders are going to be close when it comes to costs and rates.  Where you see higher costs and rates is typically lenders who market online and in the media.  Someone has to pay for the costs of all that marketing.  Who do you think they are going to pass it on to?  In most cases it’s the consumer. 

 

With that in mind, your ultimate goal is homeownership.  That’s why who you choose to do business with is so important.  You want a lender who has proven over and over again that they can get the job done.  Also, they can get it done within the timeframe you need it done.   Anyone can talk a good game, but can they perform.  So don’t be afraid to ask the questions above.   This will ensure a smooth process and the end result of you buying the home of your dreams.

 

 

Written By:

Frankie Story

NMLS#: 470734

State Licenses
IN 23815; KY MC81345

5238 Dixie Highway
Louisville, KY 40216

 

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When embarking upon the mortgage loan journey, the typical borrower’s number one concern is how they can get the lowest interest rate possible. It’s inevitable that the rate question is asked early on, as it’s an essential part of judging if taking out a mortgage is a sound financial decision. Borrowers, whether they shop around or not, want to rest assured that they’re not being swindled, particularly at a time when “rock-bottom rates” are making headlines.

 

Consumers should be aware, however, that it’s very possible that the rates they see published won’t apply to their particular situations. Property type, down payment amount, amortization term, credit score, and rate-lock duration are all variables that factor into the equation, as do points paid or rebates credited against closing costs. As such, loan originators aren’t able to quote a rate (an accurate one, anyway) on command, as it takes a bit of time to obtain and analyze that information.

 

Given that they’re dictated by the whims of the market, rates are also subject to massive fluctuations over the course of a day, which makes pinning down the absolute lowest possible rate unlikely. Some lenders do offer the option to lock a loan a second time if rates fall, but “floating down” comes at a cost that is passed onto the borrower. Floating can also backfire if rates rise instead of fall.

 

Concisely stated, mortgage loan transactions are too complex for lenders to quote rates on a lark or simple supply and demand. Some borrowers contact multiple lenders and shop around for the best rate, which the federal government endorses—lenders are required to present borrowers with documentation that encourages consumers to make comparisons—but it’s tough, if not impossible, to outsmart the market. In the spirit of capitalism, compare Lender A with Lender B; however, it’s unlikely that one will quote a rate that’s life-changingly lower than the other.


If you want to start an argument, announce to a crowd that the economy is recovering: half will agree with you, half won’t. Certainly an economic downturn can impact many, leading to short sales, foreclosures, and bankruptcies. And plenty of people are asking about buying a property that was involved in a bankruptcy. To answer that, the key issue is what type of bankruptcy was filed, and how long will it take to close?

 

Since most such sales come with no representations, warranties or indemnifications, attorneys representing buyers should make due diligence their number one priority. Section 363 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code allows parties involved in a Chapter 11 or Chapter 7 (most common for consumers) proceeding to dispose of real property in order to help pay off their debts through a highly structured process aimed at getting the most out of each asset while retaining the least liability.

 

As such, properties are sold "free and clear" from all liens and encumbrances, but it's not uncommon to later discover hidden issues, experts say, and the buying process itself can present various other hurdles. The buyer should conduct exhaustive due diligence. The trustee or debtor-in-possession rarely has access to all of the materials a buyer would typically need to see before making a decision to purchase property; sometimes a debtor has destroyed the documentation prior to the bankruptcy, or not kept it in good enough shape.

 

A buyer should take advantage of the property being “Free and Clear”. Although the transfer of the property comes with no representations or warranties, it also comes with no liens or encumbrances. A buyer should enlist a knowledgeable lender and real estate professional, and be prepared to move quickly in what could be a competitive bidding environment.

 

The main goal under any filing in bankruptcy is to give one, who is burdened with debt, a fresh start. A debtor files a petition with the court, along with a schedule of assets and creditors; a trustee is appointed to administer the sale of nonexempt property. The primary role of the trustee is to pay the secured and sometimes unsecured creditors, from the proceeds of the sale of property, and this may take up to 45-60 days to wind its way through courts – but could very well be worth it to the buyer!

 

 

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Kentucky Housing Corporation (KHC) has $3 million available in Mortgage Revenue Bond (MRB), special funding, for Active or non-active duty veterans at 2 percent interest rate, fixed for 30 years.  This special Funding program is available on a first-come, first-served basis starting Wednesday, September 6, 2017, with new reservations.

 

This Homeownership program is targeted to:

  • Households whose gross annual income does not exceed $40,000.
  • An existing or new construction property (purchase price limit $130,000).
  • 620 minimum credit score.
  • FHA, VA, or RHS first mortgage options.
  • Households that include active / non-active duty veterans or other persons receiving VA benefits.

    Documentation may include but not limited to:
    • Leave and Earnings Statement (LES)
    • DD214 - Discharge from Active Duty
    • VA Award Letter
  • Must meet insuring agency guidelines.
  • Available statewide.
  • Both Regular and Affordable DAP are available.

 

Down payment Assistance Programs (DAP) available up to $6,000. Qualifications apply. ​

If you do not qualify for this MRB special funding, there are several other loan products​ available.

​​​​​​For more information Contact us or Apply Now

 

*APR 3.058% - based on $130,000 FHA loan at 2% interest rate.

New Bond Funds may be accessed by first-time home buyers and previous homeownerspurchasing homes in targeted counties. For all other counties, New Bond Funds may only beaccessed by first-time buyers (not having owned a home in the past three years).

 

 

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