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JUST ANNOUNCED -  

According to KHC:

Effective today, KHC is lowering the minimum credit score requirement on government loans from 640 to 620, and from 680 to 660 on conventional loans.  All guides have been updated to reflect this change on KHC's website, under lenders. 

 

The Kentucky Housing Corporation offers Down Payment Closing Cost Assistance, Home Buyer Tax Credit, Housing Counseling and Education and other loan programs that help eligible homebuyers in the state of Kentucky purchase a home.  


American Mortgage has been the #1 lender for Kentucky Housing Corporation since 2002.  We have assisted more homebuyers with these programs than any other company.  

If you would like more information on these programs click the contact us button or the apply now button.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes borrowers ask, “Why don’t your rates match the ones I see online?” It is easy to quote rates out there, but every borrower should remember that their loan is different, and that often the advertised, or publicized, rates are slightly higher due to a number of factors.

 

First, the rates in Freddie Mac’s survey (which come out every week) include average discount points paid for the mortgage. But not everyone is willing to pay points: a point is 1% of the mortgage amount, charged as prepaid interest. Many borrowers do not want to pay points, and loan officers agree because unless you’re going to live in your home for a very long time, paying points often doesn’t make sense.

 

The second reason that your rate might be different than a rate you hear on the radio or see online is that your characteristics mean price adjustments. For example, a credit score on the low side will prevent you from getting the lowest rates. Low levels of home equity will also mean a pricier mortgage rate. Focusing on LTV, for example, at least a 20% equity cushion (80% LTV) in your home for a refinance, or down payment for a purchase, will help obtain a better rate for a borrower. And if a borrower wants a jumbo mortgage, you will want 25% or 30% down for the best rates.

 

Property type also influences rates: in the current environment, liens on condos usually carry a slightly higher rate unless you want to put more money down. And if your mortgage is for a vacation home or investment property, you can also expect to pay a higher rate. And lastly, some lenders have so many loans in process that they will intentionally make their rates slightly higher in order to slow down new business. Your loan officer can help answer questions on the best rate and price combination.

 

 

 

When you start the process of applying for a mortgage, you may feel as though you're giving every single bit of personal and private information to your mortgage lender. Just why does your lender need to know all of those things? Are your personal financials and credit history really necessary just to get a quote?

 

As you approach a loan officer to apply for a loan, you should be prepared to deliver quite a bit of personal information. Taking a closer look at how the loan industry works will help you understand why this is necessary.

 

 

 

Increased Scrutiny Means Increased Details

 

In the early 2000s, lenders were known for having loose underwriting for mortgages. Many people were given mortgages that they really were not qualified to have, and this led to the financial crisis of 2008 and the following real estate slump. Now, lenders are facing tighter scrutiny from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and this has triggered increased requirements when borrowers approach lenders in pursuit of a loan. In order to get a mortgage, you are going to have to give up a lot of details and prove that you are credit worthy.

 

 

 

 

Why a Credit Pull Is Vital

 

 

Borrowers who suspect they may have credit problems or who are private in nature may wish to wait to have their credit checked until they're certain they've chosen the right lender and loan. Also, some borrowers don't want to approve the credit check because they don't want to have a credit pull on their history. However, your chosen lender can't offer loan terms without pulling your credit, and if you want to have more than one quote, each lender you apply to is going to have to pull your credit. These credit pulls do have a temporary impact on your credit report, but as long as you don't have an excessive number of inquiries for different types of loans, this shouldn't create a problem.

 

 

 

A Full Financial Picture

 

Your credit score is just part of the picture that your lender will need. Your lender's also going to need to know your financial situation. This includes your income, investments and other debts. This, combined with your credit rating, will show the lender whether or not you are a safe risk. Once the lender has all of this information, they can provide you with a loan that fits your financial profiles. If there are problems, the lender can also help you know what to do to improve your credit and financial profile. If you're denied, the lender will tell you why, and you can take measures to change your situation and improve your chances of being approved for the next loan.

 

 

So yes, when you apply for a loan, you will need to offer up quite a bit of personal and financial information. It's simply part of the process. To limit the number of credit pulls and disclosure you are required to make, shop for lenders first and narrow down your choices to a couple, then apply, but don't be afraid to give up your information, because without it, you can't get a loan.

 

 

 

If you want to start an argument, announce to a crowd that the economy is recovering: half will agree with you, half won’t. Certainly the recent downturn has impacted many, leading to short sales, foreclosures, and bankruptcies. And plenty of people are asking about buying a property that was involved in a bankruptcy. To answer that, the key issue is what type of bankruptcy was filed, and how long will it take to close?

 

Bankruptcy

Since most such sales come with no representations, warranties or indemnifications, attorneys representing buyers should make due diligence their number one priority. Section 363 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code allows parties involved in a Chapter 11 or Chapter 7 (most common for consumers) proceeding to dispose of real property in order to help pay off their debts through a highly structured process aimed at getting the most out of each asset while retaining the least liability.

 

Hidden Issues

As such, properties are sold "free and clear" from all liens and encumbrances, but it's not uncommon to later discover hidden issues, experts say, and the buying process itself can present various other hurdles. The buyer should conduct exhaustive due diligence. The trustee or debtor-in-possession rarely has access to all of the materials a buyer would typically need to see before making a decision to purchase property; sometimes a debtor has destroyed the documentation prior to the bankruptcy, or not kept it in good enough shape.

 

A buyer should take advantage of the property being “Free and Clear”. Although the transfer of the property comes with no representations or warranties, it also comes with no liens or encumbrances. A buyer should enlist a knowledgeable lender and real estate professional, and be prepared to move quickly in what could be a competitive bidding environment.

 

Trustee

The main goal under any filing in bankruptcy is to give one, who is burdened with debt, a fresh start. A debtor files a petition with the court, along with a schedule of assets and creditors; a trustee is appointed to administer the sale of nonexempt property. The primary role of the trustee is to pay the secured and sometimes unsecured creditors, from the proceeds of the sale of property, and this may take up to 45-60 days to wind its way through courts – but could very well be worth it to the buyer!


For home sellers, two basic options exist. They can sell their home on their own as a for sale by owner (FSBO) property, or they can sell with the assistance of an agent. Many sellers think that working with an agent is the more costly option, and thus try to sell their home on their own without assistance. Here are 5 reasons why this may not be the best idea.

 

1. Lower Sale Price

 

Most sellers choose to go the FSBO route because want to save money. They think, "If I'm not paying a real estate agent, then I get more profit from the sale of my home." Unfortunately, any additional profits they're hoping for end up counteracted by an often lower selling price.

 

According to the National Association of REALTORS, FSBO homes have a median sales price of $185,000 in. This is compared to a median price of $245,000for agent-assisted homes. A typical agent's fee of 6% on a home price of $245,000 is just $14,700, compared to the $60,000 difference in the prices. So, even with paying an agent, the seller using an agent still makes more money on the sale of the home.

 

 

2. Slower Sale

 

Sellers who tackle the prospect on their own often don't have the marketing expertise to do it right. This means that the home may sit on the market longer, because fewer buyers see it. Since almost 90% of buyers search online for a home, an online presence is critical, and many FSBO sellers don't know how to generate a good one or don't have the tools to keep it up to date and in the sight of potential buyers.

 

 

 

 

3. More Difficult Transaction

 

The amount of paperwork necessary to legally sell a home has increased dramatically. All of the inspections, disclosures and other regulations which are mandatory are quite overwhelming, and once the property's ready to sell the process of the contract adds another layer of complexity. When someone tries to sell a home as a FSBO property, they aren't exempt from these regulations, so they must tackle the learning curve on their own. That's one of the reasons the number of FSBO properties has dramatically dropped in recent years.

 

When selling with a Realtor, sellers get the benefit of working with someone who has extensive experience in this. Agents have to study the regulations and paperwork before getting their licenses, and experienced agents have closed multiple sales to experience the process again and again. This prevents delays and frustration for the seller.

 

 

4. Too Many Negotiations

 

The home selling process can involve a number of negotiations, and most homeowners are not skilled negotiators. Not only are they going to need to negotiate with the buyer, who of course is looking for a deal, but they'll also need to negotiate with the buyer's agent. Some buyers have attorneys as well, and that represents another negotiation. The home inspector, who always finds something wrong with the house, is another place where negotiation has to happen.  Without experience in negotiation, this can be incredibly stressful for the seller. An agent comes alongside and guides these negotiations, knowing what is worth fighting for and what is worth conceding.

 

 

5. Insufficient Exposure to Buyers

 

One of the reasons successful real estate agents are successful is because they have a large reach to find prospective buyers for their homes. This starts on the internet, where the majority of buyers start their search. An agent is able to post in all online venues, including those linked to the MLS. In addition, agents know the most effective offline advertisement venues, so sellers don't waste their time posting in newspapers that no one reads. Finally, agents have buyers they're working with as well, and they're motivated to sell to their own buyers to increase their income, so they're going to show buyers the seller's property. When selling on their own, sellers must figure out all of the different venues, post the listing themselves and then hope for the best.

 

Sellers considering selling on their own have an uphill battle to face. It's always better to partner with an experienced Realtor, as doing so makes the process ahead much smoother and less stressful.

 

 

 

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