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Buy vs Rent

Traditionally first time home buyers were renting prior to buying their home. But a typical question for an LO is the “buy versus rent” question, and which one is more “affordable” for the client. But it is important for an originator to know that they understand the dynamics of their local housing markets in a way that can benefit their customers. An LO can help his or her client understand available housing options in the context of their individual financial situations and long-term financial goals.

 

 

Saving

How much money has the client saved up? An experienced LO starts with an evaluation of the client’s financial health, and calculating how much money the client has for a down payment (normally 5-20%) or deposit on a rental (usually one month of rent). Experienced originators tell clients to be sure to keep enough in savings for an emergency fund - three to six months of living expenses to cover unexpected costs.

 

 

Debt

How much debt does the potential buyer have? Current and expected financial obligations like a car payment and insurance, credit card debt, and student loans must be considered – the client should be able to make all the payments in addition to the cost of a new home. Experienced originators suggest aiming to keep total rent or mortgage payments plus utilities to less than 25 to 30 percent of gross monthly income. Recent regulatory changes limit debt to income (DTI) ratio on most mortgage loans to 43 percent.

 

 

Credit Score

Potential borrowers should know their credit score. They should work with the originator in looking at all the costs of ownership and of renting: utilities, yard maintenance, cable, rental insurance, and so on, rental insurance. They should know how long they plan on staying, or perhaps the ability to move quickly is more important.

 

So many questions that need to be answered, so little time!

 

 

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